November 9th, 2012

Screen Sound: The Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies

Number 3, 2012 Songs on the Soundtrack

Screen Sound n3, 2012

Individual Articles

  1. Cover
  2. Publishing Information
  3. Contents
  4. Editorial — Songs on the Soundtrack
    Rebecca Coyle
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords ]

    Abstract: Screen Sound number 3, 2012, includes various approaches to our theme—Songs on the Soundtrack—from textual analyses of specific films, to an historical/social analysis of music in popular films leading up to and including emergent Bollywood films located in Australia, to contributions by musician/composers about composing for synchronized and non-synchronised films. Additional non-theme articles include a profile of a leading New Zealand documentary composer, and an Australian sound designer’s perspective on designing sound environments for screen.
    Keywords: Soundtrack, songs, film music, song-scores, songs on screen

Theme Features: Songs on the Soundtrack

  1. The Architecture of Songs and Music: Soundmarks of Bollywood, a Popular Form and its Emergent Texts
    Madhuja Mukherjee
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords ]

    Abstract: This article provides detailed historical context for contemporary Bollywood melodramas, including a handful of feature films shot in Australia. It draws on interactions between technologies and media industries, and popular culture. The first section introduces the uses of music in Hindi films between 1930s and 1960s. Anna Morcom’s (2007) discussions emphasising the ‘eclecticism’ of Hindi film music, dominant tendencies, and modes through which these films deploy certain sounds and songs to produce a recognizable soundtrack are problematised. The second section of this article discusses two major shifts that occur in the patterns of production and consumption of music during the 1970s and 1980s, followed by the formation of ‘brand Bollywood’ in the 1990s. Referring to M. Madhava Prasad’s (1998) formulations, the problem of industrial, and formal ‘mobilisation’ is revisited through screen sound. While Sangita Gopal and Sujata Moorti (2008) study the popularity of Bollywood music, the author presents a more complicated mapping by investigating older musical exchanges. In this section, specific films like Disco Dancer (Babbar Subhash, 1982), as well as films situated in Australia—specifically Dil Chahta Hai (Farhan Akhtar, 2001) and Salaam Namaste (Siddharth Anand, 2005)—are analysed in relation to the musical designs of contemporary Bollywood films. This article locates the soundmarks of a popular form and historicises its new routes. In this context, Bollywood films appear like a productive model that enables us to more generally recognise the function of songs and music in cinema.
    Keywords: Bollywood, soundtrack, melodrama, Hindi film music, cinema in Australia
  2. All Mashed Up? Songs, Music and Allusionism in The Loved Ones (2009)
    Philip Hayward
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords ]

    Abstract: This article considers Australian director Sean Byrne’s 2009 horror/comedy feature film The Loved Ones with particular regard to its uses of allusionism within a popular genre context. Within this focus, the article explores the various musical components of the soundtrack (including critical use of specific songs), the creative template determined by the director and the creative input and decision making of various members of the production team. In this manner, the article profiles the film’s audio-visual text, the perceptions and motivations of the production team and considers how these relate to the film’s reception and box-office performance.
    Keywords: The Loved Ones, allusionism, film songs, soundtrack, Australian film
  3. Ana Kokkinos and the Auditory Spectator: “I wanna tell you that I’m feeling closer”
    Eloise Ross
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords ]

    Abstract: Ana Kokkinos is an acclaimed director of Australian independent films. Her portrayals of contemporary life in Melbourne, and the delicate rendering of diegetic sound interplayed with score music in her films, create rich film worlds in which her characters—and us as spectators—occupy Melbourne. With a multicultural population of over 4 million, Melbourne is Australia’s second largest city and located in the southern, temperate zone of the continent, and it has a significant profile as a locus for Australian culture, couture and cuisine. Two of Kokkinos’ feature films that paint intimate portraits of the city, Head On (1998) and Blessed (2009), present rich soundscapes that encourage identification not only with the characters but also within the space constructed by camera and soundscape. In both works, diegetic and extra-diegetic sonic moments form layered soundscapes that serve as vectors for emotion, enabling us to identify and empathise with the characters. This emotional engagement builds on the spatial and sensate world of the film, with the soundscapes suggestive of the dynamic relationship our bodies have with comfort and discomfort, belonging and dislocation, movement and silence. The integrated diegetic and extra-diegetic sound tracks encourage relationships with these films in ways connected to reality, and to the cinematic world of Melbourne.
    Keywords: Melbourne cinema, composed and compiled scores, diegetic sound, spectator, audition

Theme Shorts and Trailers: Songs on the Soundtrack

  1. The Movie, the Melody and You: How Pop Music Connects Film Narrative to its Audience
    Martin Armiger
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords ]

    Abstract: In recent years the authority of the composed film score has come under critical scrutiny. Some suggest it carries too much weight, freight and affect. The ‘song score’ has provided an alternative way of scoring film, one in which the emotional content and—crucially—the source and the authority for that emotional content exists somewhere outside the film. There is a body of common knowledge about popular music among cinema and television audiences, a familiarity on which the providers of film scores have long relied. For many years this familiarity was centred on ‘the song’ itself, that is, the composition. More recently this familiarity has been with ‘the track’, that is, the recording of the song that has most recently achieved fame. But the song score has problems of its own, to do with its inherent form, which may be rhythmically inflexible, and its own subject matter, which may be not quite apposite. In this article, I provide a composer’s perspective on these issues, and look at examples of songs in film, both triumphs and failures, from American and British cinema and from my own work in Australian film and TV.
    Keywords: Song score, soundtrack, composer, popular music, Australian cinema
  2. The Polysynchronous Film Score: Songs for a Contemporary Score for F.W. Murnau’s Faust (1926)
    Phillip Johnston
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords ]

    Abstract: Contemporary scores for silent film more often than not adhere to traditional assumptions about the relationship between music and image/narrative. This article proposes a ‘polysynchronous’ approach, which it defines as being wider and more investigative/experimental than the traditional dichotomy between synchronous versus asynchronous framed in much discussion of film music. The addition of the element of songs with words gives the composer (and librettist) an even more powerful tool to engage with the narrative. The article looks in detail at Phillip Johnston’s contemporary score for F.W. Murnau’s Faust (1926), which he has performed live in sync with the film in Australia, USA and Europe. The author shows how he and his librettist, Australian playwright Hilary Bell, use original songs in combination with instrumental music to further engage with the narrative and significantly reinterpret the ending.
    Keywords: silent film, Faust, Murnau, songs in film, polysynchronous, libretto

Additional Shorts and Trailers

  1. From Rock to Reel: An Interview with Screen Composer Neville Copland
    Henry Johnson
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords ]

    Abstract: The Dunedin-based film music composer Neville Copland is interviewed with the aim of identifying his introduction to composing for screen, his compositional techniques and the influences on his compositional style. As one of several Dunedin-based composers who has had a prolific output primarily for documentary production company, Natural History New Zealand, Copland reveals details of his creative life related to screen sound production. From the influences of rock music in his younger years as part of life in rural New Zealand, to his career as a film music composer, Copland’s work shows many traits that offer a greater understanding about screen composition in the south of New Zealand’s South Island. Offering a resourceful approach to technology, as well as a support network and collaborators, Copland shows that screen music is produced in many different ways. His particular approach has developed from his own practice rather than a set of conventions or specific training.
    Keywords: Documentary film, film music, Neville Copland, New Zealand, Dunedin sound
  2. Aural Landscapes: Designing a sound environment for screen
    Damian Candusso
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords ]

    Abstract: Cinematic environments are created through image, dialogue, music and sound, but the craft involved in creating an environmental soundtrack often goes unnoticed by the film viewer. Soundscapes are rarely just background: they are powerful storytelling vehicles in their own right, of equal importance to the visuals. This article examines the process of creating an environmental soundtrack for cinema from the perspective of a sound designer. Particular attention is given to how sound is created and layered to enhance, embellish and produce the film’s narrative. Using contemporary Australian films, notably Australia (Baz Luhrmann, 2008) and Happy Feet (George Miller, 2006), the article examines the different challenges in creating an environmental soundscape for both an animation and a live action film. The films Avatar (James Cameron, 2009), Little Fish (Rowan Woods, 2005) and The Magician (Scott Ryan, 2005) are also cited to highlight various approaches to environmental representation in film sound. While both Australia and Happy Feet rely on the landscape and environment as integral storytelling components, the approach to creating their respective soundscapes requires not only natural recordings, but also the creation of many previously unheard sounds using synthetic sound design.
    Keywords: Sound design, Australian film, soundscape, environmental representation, animation

Additional Features

  1. Contributor Profiles
August 11th, 2011

Screen Sound: The Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies

Number 2, 2011 Soundtrack Co/Improvisation

Screen Sound n2, 2011

Individual Articles

  1. Cover
  2. Publishing Information
  3. Contents
  4. Editorial — Soundtrack Co/Improvisation: Interpreting Co/Improvisation
    Rebecca Coyle
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: Screen Sound number 2, 2011, brings together contributors dealing with sound in live performance, feature films (contemporary and ‘silent’ films) and television. Six articles relate to the theme of this issue—Co/Improvisation, or the fluid interface between composition and improvisations—and another four articles offer additional studies relating to songs and performed music in films, and the business of screen composition and synchronisation. This substantial issue demonstrates the broad range and scope of Australasian research projects relevant to screen sound that are currently underway.
    Keywords: Improvisation, film composition, comprovisation, live performance, ‘silent’ cinema

Theme Features: Co/Improvisation

  1. Liveness and the Machine: Improvisation in Live Audio-Visual Performance
    Grayson Cooke
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: Live audio-visual performance is an emerging area of new media arts practice that crosses between, and draws upon, multiple artistic traditions and trajectories. Under a range of nomenclatures – VJing, Live Cinema, Live Media, Expanded Cinema – artists work solo and collaboratively with sounds and images, and significantly, they do this in a performance context. Liveness, then, with its associated notions of improvisation, spontaneity, singularity and ‘the event,’ plays a key role in how live audio-visual performance is understood, valued and marketed. Liveness is a selling point, a mark of difference that separates live performance from the recorded or ‘mediated’, such as music albums, films, television. But how live is live? And, to what degree is the live premised on what is programmed, prepared for, pre-arranged or composed? What assumptions are buried in the celebration of the live, the moment, the real-time? In this paper, with reference to my own practice as a collaborating performer in live audio-visual contexts, I shall discuss the relations between liveness and preparedness in live audio-visual performance.
    Keywords: liveness, live cinema, audio-visual, performance, improvisation, VJ
  2. Beneath Clouds and The Boys: Jazz Artists Making Film Music
    Matthew Hill
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: This article examines the compositional processes of established Australian jazz artists writing for film. Two specific case studies are discussed: the Necks’s score for the film The Boys (Rowan Woods, 1998) and Alistair Spence’s score for Beneath Clouds (Ivan Sen, 2002). Specific music cues from the films are analysed in relation to artists’ observations recorded in interviews. The artists featured in this research have well-established careers as improvising musicians and the application of their music making knowledge to the film scoring process is germane to the final film score. Key questions relevant to the film music concern the extent to which improvisation played a part in the scoring process, the application of improvisatory musical experience to the audiovisual domain, and the nature of the collaboration with the director.
    Keywords: Alister Spence, The Necks, Australian film, composition, jazz film music
  3. Scoring Essington: Composition, Comprovisation, Collaboration
    Michael Hannan
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: New music technologies have increasingly enabled elements of improvised score to be incorporated into screen music tracks, even where a score is devised for performance by orchestral ensembles. This article focuses on the music construction for a film produced for (colour) television in the first decade of the Australian cinema revival period. In 1974 the author collaborated with composers Peter Sculthorpe and David Matthews on the production of the music score for the Australian feature-length drama, Essington (Julian Pringle, 1974). This reflective practice article outlines the creative ideas behind the composition of the Essington score and focuses on comprovisation (composition involving improvisation) as distinct from then-common practice in film scoring of fully notating the underscore. In scoring Essington’s music, comprovised cues, produced mostly using unconventional piano ‘interior’ sounds (where the sounds are produced by direct contact with the strings rather than using the keyboard), were used to sonically contrast with fully notated cues written in a conventional way for the piano. This study analyses a collaborative approach that offers a useful model for contemporary (Australian) film composition practices.
    Keywords: Australian film music, Peter Sculthorpe, improvisation, comprovisation, piano interior
  4. Alternate Soundtracks: Silent Film Music for Contemporary Audiences
    Jan Thorp and Eleanor McPhee
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: The Moving Pictures Show is a contemporary Australian ‘silent’ film company that screens films produced in the period from 1912 to 1929, with a 9-piece orchestral accompaniment. This article explores the ways in which music is chosen for the show both to heighten the audience’s aesthetic experience of the film and to abide by historical practice. It also describes the ways in which improvisation can be accommodated within these boundaries. The Moving Pictures Show uses recognisable music from the non-synchronised sound (or ‘silent’ film) era, including ‘classical’ music that is well known to audiences through previous association with the animations of Disney, Warner Bros and Hanna-Barbera studios; mood music that was purpose-composed for the films of the silent era by composers such as John Stepan Zamecnik; and leitmotifs to alert the audience to repeating themes in the narrative. Around these music components, improvisation provides a degree of flexibility of tempo necessary to fit the music with the film and allows the performers the freedom to musically respond to the onscreen action in a spontaneous manner.
    Keywords: Film music, silent film, improvisation, John Stepan Zamecnik, The Moving Pictures Show

Theme Shorts and Trailers: Co/Improvisation

  1. Crafting the Sounds of Sentiment: Jen Anderson Interviewed about The Sentimental Bloke DVD score
    Jeannette Delamoir and Karl Neuenfeldt
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: Multi-instrumentalist and composer Jen Anderson used her musical, compositional and productions skills to create a folk-rock score for the 1918 silent film, The Sentimental Bloke. After 15 minutes of extra footage were discovered and restored to the film, she expanded and reworked the score. In collaboration with the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia, Anderson recorded this revised score. In an extended interview, Anderson reflects upon the musical, logistical and technical challenges she encountered, and the aesthetic decisions she made in re- presenting, via original music, an iconic Australian film. She also discusses performing live accompaniment, with two other musicians, for screenings of the film around the world. The process of recording the score allowed her to alter the instrumentation, adding extra session musicians to obtain a fuller sound. However, the trio who had performed on the film’s tours was able to maintain a ‘natural’ sound, similar to a live performance, in part through improvising while recording.
    Keywords: improvisation, Australian silent films, Australian film composers, Jen Anderson, The Sentimental Bloke
  2. Switching Tracks: Improvising Music for the Screen – A Discussion with Mike Cooper
    Philip Hayward
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: The following text is an edited version of a discussion with British musician and composer Mike Cooper that took place in October 2010 prior to his performance of an improvised score for the 1924 film Venus of the South Seas (James R. Sullivan, starring Annette Kellerman) at Griffith University’s Queensland Conservatorium of Music in Brisbane. Cooper is a colourful, iconoclastic performer and composer whose career began in the late 1960s. After establishing a profile as a folk/blues and, later, Hawaiian-styled guitarist, he transitioned into more esoteric areas of sound composition, collaboration and improvisation. He has performed with other notable experimentalists such as Mike Gibbs, David Toop, Lol Coxhill and Mike Abrahams, and released a series of recordings on independent labels and as on- demand, self-released CDs. From his home base in Rome, Cooper is now involved in recordings, performances, tours and writing around music and sound. Part 1 of this article comprises a discussion with the author on aspects of performing live accompaniments to screen media and Part 2 includes questions from other soundtrack researchers, composers and musicians present at the Conservatorium event, together with responses from Cooper.
    Keywords: Mike Cooper, improvisation, silent film score, Tabu, Venus of the South Seas

Additional Features

  1. Sync Agents and Artist Managers: A Scarcity of Attention and an Abundance of Onscreen Distribution
    Guy Morrow
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: This article explores the role of synchronisation agents, and the current music business environment in Australasia more generally, in order to examine the various methods for music and image synchronisation and the extent to which the process of synchronisation can assist artist managers in building and maximizing their clients’ musical careers. ‘Sync agents’ are similar to song publishers. However, while song publishers work to maximise revenue from the exploitation of the performance and mechanical copyright of songs and having the songs in their catalogue synchronised with visual imagery, sync(hronisation) agents just work with the latter. Chris Anderson’s ‘Long Tail’ theory (2006) provides the model for arguing that the exchange value of musical copyrights has decentralised and therefore, as aggregators, sync agents are in the best position to generate revenue from synchronising more songs with a lot more images. This contrasts with artists or artist managers who are poorly positioned to generate revenue via this means. The article reports on a research project involving the International Music Managers Forum that seeks to create new standards in relation to artist management practices in the contemporary dispersed media context.
    Keywords: Screen songs, synchronisation, artist manager, sync agent, ‘long tail’ theory
  2. Ancient Archetypes: The ‘Greek Chorus’ in The Tracker‘s Songs
    Anthony Linden Jones
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: Rolf de Heer’s film The Tracker (2002) is a fictional representation of period, location, characters and events but has strong echoes of historical documentation. It is, essentially, a morality play, much akin to Aesop’s fables. By not revealing character names in the film, de Heer renders the players as ancient archetypes, like the anthropomorphic animals of Aesop. The film is confronting and thought- provoking yet a number of key elements serve to disrupt a realist reading of the film: most particularly, the use of a series of songs that function like the Chorus of ancient Greek drama to compensate for the inability of the characters to interrelate on any kind of emotional level. Performed by Australian Aboriginal singer Archie Roach, the songs were written by (non-indigenous) Rolf de Heer and composer Graham Tardif. Do the songs serve as a bridge between cultures, or as a potential site for antagonism? How does the ‘Greek Chorus’ dramatic device function in the context of a contemporary Australian feature film? In attending to these questions, this paper outlines the history of the use of the device of the ‘Greek Chorus’ in cinema and investigates its application in this film.
    Keywords: The Tracker, Rolf de Heer, indigenous Australian, Greek Chorus, film songs, Archie Roach

Additional Shorts and Trailers

  1. Screen Music Futures: Deriving Income from Screen Composition – An Australian Industry Symposium
    Rebecca Coyle and Natalie Lewandowski
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: A public symposium co-hosted by the Australian Guild of Screen Composers and a Southern Cross University research team was held at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School, Sydney, in September 2010. The event was coordinated by Jo Smith, Executive Manager of the AGSC, with session host Rebecca Coyle, and the speakers were composers Guy Gross, Christopher Gordon and Amanda Brown; composer/AFTRS educator Martin Armiger; composer and President of the AGSC, Clive Harrison; and Michelle O’Donnell from the Australasian Performing Rights Association. The article comprises an edited extract of the symposium transcription that focuses on the business aspects of screen music production, and how composers can generate income from their work in the future.
    Keywords: Australian screen music, Australian Guild of Screen Composers, screen music industry, Australasian Performing Rights Association
  2. Directing Music-Based Documentaries: Curtis Levy on The Matilda Candidate and Hephzibah
    Adolfo Cruzado
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: This article features an interview with director Curtis Levy who discusses the creative process in his music-based documentaries and the storytelling challenges inherent in musical characters and music subjects. Levy’s documentary film, The Matilda Candidate (2010), follows the comedic journey taken by the filmmaker as he stands for election to the Australian Senate on the platform that the popular folk song, ‘Waltzing Matilda’, should become the national anthem. The Matilda Candidate is a ‘hybrid’ style documentary incorporating interviews, archival footage, essay reflections, comedy and observational techniques to tell its story. In the second part of this article, Curtis comments on another music-based documentary, his multi-award winning Hephzibah (1998) that investigates the life of the American- Australian concert pianist and human rights activist, Hephzibah Menuhin (1920-1981). Levy indicates how he uses music to enhance the viewer’s response and other layers and forms of storytelling to engage TV audiences.
    Keywords: Curtis Levy, The Matilda Candidate, Hephzibah, music-based documentaries, Australian documentary film
  3. Contributor Profiles
September 20th, 2009

Screen Sound: The Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies

Number 1, 2010 Sound Tracks the Place

Screen Sound n1, 2010

Individual Articles

  1. Cover
  2. Publishing Information
  3. Contents
  4. Editorial — Sound Tracks the Place: Australasian Soundtrack Studies
    Rebecca Coyle
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: This is the inaugural issue of a new open access journal of screen sound studies. The aim of Screen Sound: The Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies is to investigate, analyse and document sound as it occurs in relation to screen images, on the large or small screen, in installation or online. Sound elements, functions and production are included in their various forms. The journal is multidisciplinary in its remit, accommodating music, sound, media, cultural, marketing and economic analysis.
    Keywords: Soundtrack, screen studies, Australasia, journal

Features

  1. Undead and Its ‘Undecidable’ Soundtrack
    James Wierzbicki
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: Michael and Peter Spierig’s 2003 feature Undead is a curious production that is both a comic riff on zombie movies and a serious science-fiction story. This article shows that the film does not simply alternate between the two plot modes; rather, in many instances, it simultaneously features elements of comedy and drama, with one intruding into the territory of its opposite in such a way that the narrative often seems to be hovering—like the classic zombie that is neither dead nor alive—in the liminal space between the two modes. More significantly, the essay argues that, while Cliff Bradley’s (extra-diegetic) score enables the film to shift smoothly from one mode to the other, it is largely Peter Spierig’s subtle sound design that allows the film to be both comic and serious at the same time, to have the zombie-like quality of what Jacques Derrida, in his writings on literature and politics, calls ‘undecidability’.
    Keywords: Spierig, Undead, zombie, undécidabilité, soundtrack
  2. Numinous Ambience: Spirituality, Dreamtimes and Fantastic Aboriginality
    Philip Hayward
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: Peter Weir’s apocalyptic thriller The Last Wave (1977) drew on aspects of Aboriginal culture and spiritual beliefs to construct a highly atmospheric fantasy of indigenous ‘otherness’ enacted in contemporary Sydney. This article analyses the film’s score and sound design and, in particular, the manner in which it creates sonic ambiences and dramatic emphases within the narrative. The article commences with discussion of the Aboriginal concept of the Dreamtime (and how this has been interpreted by Western writers) and then proceeds to consider how Aboriginality has been represented in film scores, with particular emphasis on the role of the iconic Aboriginal didjeridu. Following a consideration of how US popular fictional texts (such as Philip Kaufman’s 1983 film The Right Stuff) have engaged with aspects of indigenous Australian spirituality, the main body of the article looks at the ways that score and sound combine in particular moments in The Last Wave, the nature of the musical sounds (and cultural associations) deployed and the film’s ‘sonic conclusion’.
    Keywords: Aboriginality, Dreamtime, Peter Weir, numinosity, ambience
  3. More Than Noise: The Integrated Sound Track of Noise
    Nick Hadland
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: Conventional discourses accounting for film music’s subordination and the vertical stratification of image, sound and music have been superseded by more integrated and complex scoring approaches. Contemporary Australian films utilising a hybridised or interdisciplinary approach and, influenced by new technologies and media, adopt a more unified method of ‘sounding’ their narratives. Analysing Matthew Saville’s Noise (2007), this article will highlight the operation of sound and music in relation to the film’s principal themes, exposing the complex machinations of the film’s auditory components. It will discuss these complexities with particular reference to the new perspective they provide to the film noir genre.
    Keywords: Australian film, film noir, film music, sound design, Noise
  4. Sounding East Of Everything: Australian Television, Music and Place
    Liz Giuffre
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: East of Everything is a contemporary Australian television drama series shot on the New South Wales North Coast in and around the popular tourist destination of Byron Bay. In addition to utilising the region’s visual beauty—a cinematographic technique commonly employed in Australian drama—East of Everything has harnessed the musical culture that has developed in the area over time. The series relies on its soundtrack to create a sense of place and illuminate the program’s dramatic progression. This article will explore the use of music to ‘place’ East of Everything, examining the incorporation of pre-existing and specially commissioned material. I will show that the sonic representation of place through music has been key to the program’s success, and that place in the Australian drama is revealed sonically to be as diverse, emotive and striking as the region’s visual landscape.
    Keywords: Television, Soundtrack, Australian music, Byron Bay, Surfing Culture

Shorts and Trailers

  1. The Brian May Collection: Two Decades of Screen Composition
    Michael Hannan
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: Brian May (1934-1997) was a pioneer of the Australian feature film revival period. He was one of the most prolific composers in this period, writing the scores for 22 Australian feature films (from 1975 to 1994), in addition to producing music for Australian television projects and a number of American feature film scores and television series. Brian May bequeathed his collection of music manuscripts and other related items to the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia. This article outlines the contents of this collection, the gaps in the collection and problems associated with sorting the many thousands of items. It makes a case for the national heritage significance of the collection and its value as a resource for the research of Australian screen music.
    Keywords: Brian May, screen composition, music manuscripts, archival research, national heritage
  2. Documenting Sound: An Interview with Screen Composer Trevor Coleman
    Henry Johnson
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: New Zealand composer Trevor Coleman has created over 70 documentary film soundtracks, primarily with Natural History New Zealand. Besides composing for film, Coleman is a pianist and trumpeter, and leader and performer for various jazz fusion bands working in and around Dunedin. The article centres on an interview that covers the composer’s background and compositional process and style.
    Keywords: Trevor Coleman, documentary film, composition, New Zealand
  3. Music for The Silent One: An Interview with Composer Jenny McLeod
    Riette Ferreira
    [ Abstract ] [ Keywords]

    Abstract: The Silent One is a significant film in the context of New Zealand (NZ) cinema for several reasons. It was the first New Zealand drama feature film directed by a woman and the first using a Dolby stereo soundtrack. Its incorporation of underwater film sequences played a vital part in portraying the world of the film’s central character, Jonasi, a deaf-mute. Jonasi’s vocal inability allows for other sound elements to play an important role in the narrative and emotional content. One such element is the music score provided by Jenny McLeod who discusses her work on the film in the following interview.
    Keywords: The Silent One, Jenny McLeod, film score, New Zealand film
  4. Contributor Profiles

Call for papers:

Screen Sound n5, 2014: The fifth issue of Screen Sound is scheduled for publication in mid 2014. The issue theme is Interactive and Game Audio. [more information]

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